Palazzi dei Rolli of Genoa - Italy - World Heritage List

Via Garibaldi 7 - Nicolosio Lomellini


Via Garibaldi 7 - Nicolosio Lomellini

Via Garibaldi 7
( See the map )
FounderNicolosio Lomellini
Locality Strade Nuove
Roll 1576Level 1 Titular Nicolosio Lomellini
Roll 1588Level 2 Titular q. Nicolosio Lomellini
Roll 1599Level 2 Titular Nicolosio Lomellini
Roll 1614Level 1 Titular Luigi Centurione
Roll 1664Level 1 Titular Barnaba Centurione

Built between 1559 and 1565 by Giovanni Battista Castello, called the "Bergamasco," and by Bernardo Cantone for Nicolosio Lomellino, an exponent of a family who was in full economic and political ascent. At the outset of the seventeenth century, the property fell into the hands of the Centurione family who refurbished the building's interior. The building was subsequently owned by the Pallavicini and later the Raggi families, until it finally fell into the hands of Andrea Podest?, several-time mayor of Genoa between 1866 and 1895.
The fa?ade, on which the Bergamasco's influence is clearly noticeable, is enlivened by rich stucco decorations, with winged male herms supporting the cornice marking the ground floor; battle trophies nestled among ribbons and draperies on the first floor; and garlands and mascarons surmounting the windows, with classical figures within oval medallions on the second floor.
Bergamasco's handiwork is also discernible in the festive stucco decorations in the oval atrium. The artist introduced Genoa to the latest Mannerist style.
The sides of the open courtyard are enclosed by the building's hind wings, while terraces surmount a grandiose nymphaeum sculpted during the eighteenth century on the basis of a drawing by Domenico Parodi. A garden opens out towards the hills, built by exploiting the sloping hill beyond.
In two drawing rooms on the piano nobile, Giacomo Antonio Boni painted the fresco "Jove and the Goat Amalthea" and Domenico Parodi that of "Bacchus and Ariadne." The decorative stuccoes and frescoes depicting divinities on the gallery vault are by Lorenzo De Ferrari. The room decorated by Aldovarandini has been ornamented with a series of canvasses with Stories of the Goddess Diana by Marcantonio Franceschini.