Palazzi dei Rolli of Genoa - Italy - World Heritage List

Via Garibaldi 6 - Andrea e Gio. Batta Spinola


Via Garibaldi 6 - Andrea e Gio. Batta Spinola

Via Garibaldi 6
( See the map )
FounderAndrea e Gio. Batta Spinola
Locality Strade Nuove
Roll 1576Level 1 Titular Gio. Batta Spinola q. Nicola
Roll 1588Level 2 Titular q. Gio. Batta Spinola q. Nicola q. Daniele
Roll 1599Level 1 Titular q. Gio. Batta Spinola q. Nicola q. Daniele
Roll 1614Level 1 Titular q. Gio. Batta Spinola q. Nicola q. Daniele
Roll 1664Level 1 Titular Gio. Stefano Spinola q. Franco

Built in 1563 by the architect Bernadino Cantone for Giovanni Battista and Andrea Spinola, the palazzo was initially constructed as a solid cube with no external decoration. Considerable changes were made between the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries when an additional floor was added. In 1723 the palazzo was acquired by the Doria family, noblemen and subsequently marquises of Montaldeo.
After the devastating damage inflicted during the bombardment by the French fleet in 1684, the fa?ade was decorated with its current stucco, with pairs of pilaster strips divided by the window frames.
In the atrium there is a large pensile lantern crowned with the heraldry eagle, the emblem of the Doria family. This room leads onto the colonnade courtyard and then on to the diminutive, charming hanging garden.
The interior is richly decorated, most of which can be attributed to the Semino workshop. The frescos on the vaulted ceilings of the drawing room reflect the Spinola family's desire to celebrate their dynasty, representing "The embassy of Oberto Spinola and Federico Barbarossa" and other events involving the family. In one room, Andrea and Ottavio Semino show the usual mythological themes, such as the passions of the gods, favourites of Genoese clients: "Jupiter and Daphne", "Neptune and Proserpina", "Venus and Adonis", "Jupiter and Europa", "Jupiter and Antiope".
A room on the upper floor is particularly interesting with elegant eighteenth century rococo stuccoes and valuable furnishings, and ceiling vault frescoed by Luca Cambiaso with the "Fall of Phaethon" and other episodes of punished audacity such as the "Fall of Icarus".
The magnificent sixteenth century mannerist fireplace in marble dominates the drawing room, and five Flemish tapestries dating back to the end of the sixteenth century adorn the walls with "Stories of Abraham".
In a parlour on the upper floor you can still see the large picture gallery established by the Doria family in its original eighteenth century configuration.