Palazzi dei Rolli of Genoa - Italy - World Heritage List

Via Garibaldi 4 - Thobia Pallavicini


Via Garibaldi 4 - Thobia Pallavicini

Via Garibaldi 4
( See the map )
FounderThobia Pallavicini
Locality Strade Nuove
Roll 1576Level 1 Titular Thobia Pallavicino
Roll 1588Level 2 Titular Fabrizio Pallavicino
Roll 1599Level 1 Titular Fabrizio Pallavicino
Roll 1614Level 1 Titular Fabrizio e Gio. A. Pallavicino
Roll 1664Level 1 Titular Tobia Pallavicino

he building, which is currently the seat of the Chamber of Commerce, was constructed between 1558 and 1561 for Tobia Pallavicino by Giovanni Battista Castello il Bergamasco with the assistance of Bartolomeo Riccio, Domenico Solari and Antonio Roderio. The sixteenth-century structure consisted of a square-shaped two-floor body and two mezzanines. The building did not undergo significant alterations until the beginning of the eighteenth century, when, having fallen under the ownership of the Carrega family it was raised by one floor and considerably expanded. Two perpendicular wings and the rear part of the building enclosed by a simple plaster facade overlooking Piazza del Ferro were built.
Thanks to Bergamasco's handiwork, the sides of the building and the vault in the vestibule on the piano nobile have been entirely coated with stuccoes and grotesques, as well as frescoed panels depicting Apollo playing the cithara with the Muses and musical figures. The chapel was decorated by Lorenzo De Ferrari in the eighteenth century and bears stucco and fake stucco architecture framing the fresco with a flight of angels. Even the doors bearing two medallions depicting the Annunciation and a Nativity have been painted on canvass by the same painter.
The golden gallery enclosing the eighteenth-century structure of the building constitutes a significant example of the Rococo style in Genoa. It was entirely conceived by De Ferrari between 1734 and 1744, on the basis of a unified drawing which blends golden stuccoes, mirrors, and frescoes. The vault's central medallion and the ovals on canvass depict key scenes from the Aeneid, from the Council of the Gods to the Murder of Turnus.